Memories, page one

Subject: Willie Victor Reunion
Date: Sun, 18 Apr 1999 14:21:25 -0500
From: "Jess Davis" <jcdavis@tcac.net>
To: <weslee@minn.net>

Greetings shipmate, I joined Aewbarronpac in 1964, went to flight engineer
school and made several barrier flights before decommissioning the
squadron. That was probably the best tour of duty in my 26 years in the
Navy. I remember those flights out of Midway Island real well. I don't
think we made a takeoff during daylight hours, seems like all of them were
22:00 preflight and a 01:00 takeoff. Then there was the old 40 north drill
with the poopy suits. Most of all though I remember the aircraft itself,
what a beautiful sweet flying aircraft. Also the professionalism of the
flight crews and back end crews that made everything come together and
accomplish the mission that we were sent out to do. Even though it has been
35 years since I last flew Willies, i still occasionally find myself day
dreaming about that most satisfying tour of ny Navy career. After
Aewbarronpac, I went to VP-31 for flight engineer training in P-3 aircraft
and then back to Barbers Pt. to VP-6. I checked into VP-6 as the first P-3
flight engineer while they were transitioning to P-3's. Later on, I made
chief and shore duty cound me back at VP-31 where I became the COMNAVAIRPAC
flight engineer evaluator from 1968 to 1970. Most of the rest of my Naval
career was in VP-19 (5years) , NAS Alameda, and VP-47 where I retired in
Dec. 1980 as AFCM. I am tentatively planning to make the reunion in Oct.,
hope to see some old shipmates and hear some more sea stories about Connies.
Heard lots of them sitting around BMEP alley at
Midway. AFCM Jess Davis,USN
Ret. jcdavis@tcac.net
 

Guys,
My wife and I visited Barber's Point in the summer of '96. They were
in the process of closing it down. I was able to talk security into
letting me drive around the base for a little while.
BBP was virtually deserted. Our old hangar housed a P3 squadron
(squadrons?). And I believe there were a couple of carrier-based
squadrons nearby. Other than that, Barber's Point resembled a ghost
town.
The last time I was there was when my reserve P2V squadron flew
there for our 2 weeks active duty in 1969. I ran into Herbie Schamp, and
he took me to his transport squadron hangar to meet some of the guys I
knew from AEW.
Don Lee
 

Guys,
A short time ago, Gary Harrington tried to send via E-mail our old
flight crew assignment schedule. I'm not too sure how it came out, but
it wasn't too legible; it was originally mimeographed.
Anyway, Barrier Flight Crew assignment sheet (front-end only) dated
21 April 1960 is available if anyone wants a copy. I don't mind
spreading it around to jog people's memories as we try to re-establish
contact with some of our former shipmates.
Just E-mail your name and address, and I'll send it ASAP. Perhaps
someone can help us track somebody down by providing their full name and
their hometown/state.
We could surprise someone like Lee Kalsch!
Regards,
Don Lee
 

Guys,
From what I can remember, ComBarPac had SSB and TTY net with Adak,
Midway, and CINCNORAD, other stations I don't recall. And yes, I
remember clearly SSB was experimented with but proved to be a failure.
Many times we had to copy CW signals coming through sunspots and bagpipe
jamming, and we were able to copy through all the crap.
If anyone is interested, I still have my radio packet from my P2
squadron. It has the sheets from the DNC5B manual (Navy communications),
preflight procedures for all communications and navigation gear, and the
manual for the VP flight communication class from NAS Los Alamitos. And
I also have a NATOPS Flight Manual for the SP-2E
(P2V7, I think).
In 1968, when I was assigned to VP Flight Communications School for
two weeks, Gary Harrington lived in a house across the street from Los
Alamitos.
Don Lee
 
 

Guys,
I remember making a flower run only one time in a SNB. We went to Hilo,
and
the sweet smell almost suffocated me.
Don Lee
 

G. D. Payne wrote:

> Ah yes $5.00 for a big box of orchids. Did you ever do it the SNB's???
>
> At 08:06 AM 5/4/99 -0700, Joe Buffalo wrote:
> >Nice story Gib. I also practiced a lot on old "ART13" in The
> >R7V.............I got my practice between Midway and BBP. Also we used
to
> >take the "Flower" run over to the other Islands and pick up flowers for
> >everyone. Most of the flight crew was there just to keep their 4-hours
a
> >month for flight pay. I didn't have that problem.....logged over 5,000
> >hours on the barrier.
> >
> >Joe Buffalo
> >Radioman F7 primary, plus a few more flight crews over 4 years at
> >AEWBARRONPAC
 

> >>I still have callouses on my thumbs from tuning the ART13. If anybody
wants
> >>to learn how, there is an airplane here in Memphis with an ART13, ARR 15
> >>and LM in it, it is a B17 called the Memphis Belle. I will be glad to
teach
> >>a class in that lost art. I well remember flying an early morning
training
> >>flight so I could have the afternoon off to go water skiing . In fact I
had
> >>my swimsuit on under my flight suit. At the completion of the training
> >>flight we taxied in and parked next to an R7V with #1 and #2 turning.
> >>Waiting for me at the bottom of the ladder was Chief Lorenzten, he was
> >>pointing at the R7. He said for me to get on the R7, they were taking
an
> >>engine up to Adak for WV that needed it. He said he had sent Dick
Dempey
> >>to pack me a bag. He said I had to go because I was the only radioman he
> >>had available that could tune the ART13. The guys in the barracks at
Adak
> >>looked at me kind of strange when I took my flight suit off and had on a
> >>swimming suit. There was snow on the ground in Adak.
> >>Another time I caught a reserve R5D from BPP to Alemeda to go on leave,
> >>August 1961. The reserve radioman came and woke me up about 5 hours out
> >>and told me they were going to turn back in the next hour if he didn't
get
> >>a position report out. He didn't have a clue how to tune that ART13. I
> >>tuned it up, got a postion report out and then the Plane Commander came
> >>back there and told him to get me out the seat. That was fine with me,
I
> >>went back to the back went back to sleep. That was the only report the
> >>poor guy got out the whole flight but it kept us from turning around.
You
> >>just had to develop a relationship with that contraption and let it know
> >>who was the boss. You also need a fair share of luck.
> >>Things have sure changed. I have a radio in my airplane that I have had
> >>since 1992 and it has never failed. It also accepts exactly the
frequency I
> >>want to be on. No more looking it up in some book and putting in a
strange
> >>code representing what you really want.
> >>didah didadit
> >>Gib Pierce
 

Guys,
Dave Germeyer just wrote about ditching practice and air-sea rescue
at Keehi Lagoon.
And I wrote about our practice session off Ford Island. Remember when we
had to set up the raft, solar still, and the Gibson Girl?
Anyway, I was the last guy to be picked up by the Marine chopper.
Off in the distance I could hear the Pearl Harbor tour boat. I thought
if those folks could see me they would kind of freak out seeing an Asian
guy while the tour guide described the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.
LOL.
I remember the first time I saw the Arizona memorial; it was aboard
the USS Pickaway, APA 222, a Navy troopship. We were all on deck with
our dress whites to honor the Arizona. It was kind of strange knowing
there were almost 1,200 sailor entombed in the sunken ship.
When I took my wife to see the Arizona in 1996, there was a huge
monument built over the Arizona instead of just an American flag
attached to the stack. And we learned something interesting; if you are
an Arizona survivor, when you die, you can have your ashes placed inside
the Arizona.
Don Lee
 

Guys,
I don't remember our barracks having windows (There's a lot of
things I don't remember). Didn't our barracks just have screening
material from about four feet to the ceiling?
Don Lee
 

Gilbert H Pierce wrote:

> The VW12 barracks at BBP had no windows, Just screening with a canvas
> covering strung on cables that you could pull across the screen to block
> the rain when it was blowing.
> I don't remember what the inflight barracks at MDY had. The COMBARPAC
> barracks at BPP was a new modern cinder block affair with glass windows
> that cranked open. Don, I believe that barracks was brand new when you
and
> I got there in the fall of 1958. September I believe. I have pictures of
> us in our 4 man cubicles in that barracks.
 

Guys,
I remember the first time I was on Midway; there was a god-awful
storm, blowing with a downpour, and I saw a guy putting on a jacket.
When I asked him where he was going in nasty weather, he said he was
going to walk on the beach. Seeing the shock on my face, he explained
that during vicious storms the waves would wash up glass balls that were
used on Japanese fishing nets. I said, "Oh, good luck!"
Don Lee
 

Guys,
Hodes and I were having a discussion last night. Help us sort
something out.
We had E and E school for 2 days; one day to evade the Marines, and
one day for the p.o.w. camp. The p.o.w. camp was in an old gun
emplacement at BBP.
But we were also taken by bus for a day by a Special Forces group up
above Schofield Barracks. This was another p.o.w. camp, and we were
trained in overt/covert
operations in a camp.
Do you guys remember it this way? How did you guys make it up to
that camp above Schofield barracks?
Don Lee
 

Guys,
How about the time we had to inflate our flight suit in the pool? I
complained like hell.
And it wasn't because I couldn't do it; although, like a lot of guys, I
swallowed my share of water. I thought this exercise was dumb! We all
reported for this ditching exercise with a flight suit one or two sizes
larger than the one we usually wore. Which means, if we happened to
really ditch with a flight suit that fit us, we were in deep doo-doo.
Don Lee
 

Robert Hodes wrote:

> I remember that when it was my turn to be interrogated in the dark room,
someone
> shot off a pistol (blanks) close to my head. Now THAT was a surprise. My
ears
> rang for awhile. Hey maybe I can blame that marine for starting my
tinnitus....
 

From: Fred Murrell <k7rdn@juno.com>
To: sacdlee@earthlink.net

Hi Don;
My name is Fred Murrell, I was in Vw 12 a short time as First Radioman
(1957), then went into VW 16 until early 1959, I then put in the "Ham"
shack" at the hanger in Hawaii. I had a neat job, I ran phone patches to
Midway Island twice a day, all my free time I spent talking around the
world. I also had a "Ham" station at home in EWA BEACH, my call was
KH6CVH. I went Stateside in late 1959, retired from the Navy at NAS Sand
Pt. in 1961, started carrying mail in Seattle a few months later, in
1978, I turned in my Navy pension and retired at age 55 with 351/2 yrs.
of combined milatiry and federal service. We moved to Az. and got into
Touring with the Honda Gold Wing motorcycle folk's. I've had 7 of them
and we visted most of the U.S and quite a few province's in Canada. I had
a brand new 1990 Gold Wing SE (top of the line) with only 4700 mi. on it
when I got throat cancer, had 38 radiation treatments, I lost 60 lbs. my
teeth, and have no siliva glands, I still only wiegh 133 lbs.down from
190, but I'm still here, had to convert my bike to a trike (pic.
enclosed) have put over 40,000 mi. on it., rode to Wis. for my 55th
hi-scool reunion in 1955, been married 53 yrs. to Joan, we lived in the
same town in Wis.
Before I forget, please send me the barrier flt. crew assign. sked.
dated 21 April, 1960. I knew Lt. Ed Mills quite well, he was a "Ham",we
were at Midway at different times, I ran phone patches for him when he
was at Midway and I was in Hawaii, then he did it for me when I was at
Midway. I had 6 or 8 thousand hrs. as first radioman on the Connies going
back to 1955-56 in Pax River,Md. training in B-17's, then going to
Lockheed in Burbank,Ca. to pick up our Squadron's first barrier plane, at
Pax. the crew kept the plane they picked up, the crew"s name"s were
printed on the outside of the plane. We flew to Europe quite a bit to
practise with the 7th fleet, also went to a lot of air shows as the plane
was a big draw.
I hope your still awake after reading all this boreing stuff, but
it"s fun to return to the past, bet you went to the Ham station at Midway
(KM6BI) a time or to. "Jersey" was the Midway Op. of the station, he died
about a year ago. The telephone man on Midway was a civilien , also a
Ham, as was the guy from the non- military hanger at Midway, I t was a
airline for cargo, if a plane broke down at Wake Is. for example, they
would contact Midway and have the part shipped out by him, WHAT A NEAT
JOB!!!!!, I think the airline was Tiger we used to go to that hanger in
our off time, have drink's and play poker. Forgive me, I was going to
sign, and got on another play back, HI HI. This is it.

73 Fred K7RDN
 

Hi Don;
I had a few questions for you, did you get the attachment I sent you
of my trike ? I was really messed up, don't know if I sent you 1 or 3
attachments, my memory is something else.
I am the Red Murrell, but now it is Fred as the age is 76 and the
hair is no longer red, my address is >Fred Murrell
2605 S. Tomahawk
Rd. #229
Apache
Junction,Az. 85219-9151<
I was in VW12 for a very short time, then went into VW16 until I left
Hawaii,I'm sure the Barrier had not started at Midway as we trained in
Hawaii for awhile, setting up crews and flying training missions, doing
lots of touch and go landings and so on. I wonder if you can check to see
if I'm right about that. I thought the barrier flights started around
Aug. of 1957, I remember flying to Midway a time or two when they were
building the hanger, the new mess hall, and the Ships Store. About all
for now,let me know what you find out.
 

From: "Dave Germeyer" <DGermeye@messiah.edu>
To: <Weslee@minn.net>

Just ran into these web sites. I was attached to VW-14, Crew 14 from June
1957 thru to Feb 1960. Flew as 1st Radio and Crew Chief. These sites bring
back many memories.
More later. Would like to make a reunion sometime.

Luke the LID was one of my second radio ops!

Dave Germeyer, AT2
 

Hi Don,
Does your manual show how to tune a #%$&** ART-13. I don't think I EVER
figured out how to properly tune one of those. I used to hate the R7V
flights
from BBP to Midway using one of those.

After I left BBP and got out of the Navy in Jan 1961, I joined a reserve P2V
(2 turnin-2 burnin) squadron out of Los Alamitos. Ironically, 5 years later
I bought my first house in Seal Beach which was across the street from Los
Al
and lived there when you were flying out of there. Scary!
Cheers.
Gary Harrington.
 

Gents:

This is what I sent the Captain so far, he only wanted to know about the CW
thing........LOL

>Captain:
>
>I emailed this info to your sisters email addy. Perhaps that was a
mistake,
>as I have not received a reply from you. Therefore I am sending copies to
>you at this email addy.
>
>Captain:
>
>Real easy to answer if you BTDT, so here goes.
>
>The CIC Plotter had message blanks where he filled in the blanks for
contact
>designator, location (i.e. AJBC34, [map grids]) course, speed, altitude and
remarks. >The CIC Officer on watch would initial the Contact Report, then
the CIC Plotter would >hand deliver the Contact Report to the Radio Operator
on duty. If it was a "Initial Report"
>the message was assigned a "Flash" (Z) Precedence. Amplifying Reports were
>"Emergency" (Y) Precedence. The only other Precedence used on the
>Pacific Barrier by the aircraft was "Operational Immediate" (O) for
Position
>Reports etc. etc. The Radioman would send & receive for the contact traffic
>in CW (International Morse Code). COMBARPAC, at NAS Barbers Point Hawaii
>was net control for the Pacific Barrier CW traffic. They had a large
>"War Room" that had a wall with a map of the Pacific on it. There were
>Plotters, Evaluators and Senior Evaluators on duty at all times. Net
>control (COMBARPAC) had, I believe it was either 3 or 5 minutes to evaluate
>an initial contact (compare contact location with known plots). If they had
>not identified the contact by that time, the Senior Evaluator would pick up
>the "Red Phone" and be direct with NORAD within the Colorado mountain
>
>They attempted to use Single Side Band (SSB) HF Voice for transmitting and
>receiving Contact Reports. They installed the SSB gear in several of our
>aircraft for testing. The plan was that the CIC Officer could transmit and
>receive contact traffic from his duty station. It did not work very well
>due to the crazy Atmospherics present in the Northern Pacific. After
>approximately 3 months, the SSB gear was removed. Even with Atmospherics
>and Russian Jamming from the Kamchatka Peninsula, CW
>proved it's worth once again.
>
>Some of our aircraft had "Camera Scopes" (that's what we called them)
>installed for testing, just aft of the Navigators Position. The theory was
>that if an aircraft or station ship (DER) had a contact that acted strange,
>or was unique in anyway, the Camera Scope could be used to relay the Radar
>Image to COMBARPAC in Hawaii. The originating aircraft, or DER
>could synchronize their Camera Scopes and leap frog the Image (i.e.
>Aircraft, DER, Aircraft, DER etc. etc. to Midway Island, where it would
then
>be transmitted to COMBARPAC for evaluation via Underwater Cable. There
>also were Plexiglas Overlays that you could put in the Camera Scope and
>send messages (written with Grease Pencil on the Overlay) via Radar
>(Camera Scope to Camera Scope) between the Aircraft and DER's. The
>Camera Scope concept did not work very well either, and was discontinued
>after about 5-6 months.
>
>
>All of the above happened in the last half of 1960 and into 1961. I left
in
>November of 1961, and even then we all knew that the Pacific Barrier was
>being phased out. To the best of my knowledge there were no additional
>tests conducted with radio or radar gear on the Pacific Barrier WV-2's
until
>the Barrier was decommissioned. and the aircraft had been reassigned.
>
>An additional tidbit.......
>Some of our aircraft had internal ductwork installed, with inlet and outlet
>that opened outside the cabin. This ductwork had a plenum box (?) that
>contained a filter (similar to a common furnace filter setup). Every time
>these particular aircraft landed, they were met by two guys in white suits,
>driving a little white truck. They would come aboard the aircraft and
>quickly change filters and leave. They told us that they were running a
>test to determine what type of insects were present in the Northern Pacific
>Atmosphere. Years later we all figured out that they were sampling the air
>for nuclear particles, indicating Russian Nuclear Tests.. I don't remember
>the ductwork being removed from these aircraft.
>
>Another tidbit........
>Some of our aircraft were assigned Special Ops. to work with Air Force
>C-119's equipped with special gear to retrieve returning US Space Capsules
>(containing monkeys we were told) in the Western Pacific by snagging the
>capsules parachute shroud lines, and then cranking the snagged capsule
>aboard through their rear "Clam Shell" doors. The C-119's did not have 360
>degree azimuth radar so our aircraft would vector the C-119 towards the
>returning capsule until they had obtained a plot on their radar. Years
>later we all figured out that they were recovering the monthly edition from
>a spy satellite.
>
>Another tidbit……
>The Russian's were dropping missiles in the the Western Pacific off & on
>during the late 1950's and early 1960's. They always had a minimum of 3
>Telemetry Ships in the recovery area (Triangulation???). Some of our crews
>were assigned Special Ops., keeping these ships under surveillance 24 hours
>a day while they were recovering missiles. Out of boredom, the pilots would
>occasionally "Buzz the Decks" of one on the ships (Yep! with a WV-2).
>Usually, everybody on deck would salute us with the International Hand
>Signal, informing us that we were number 1.
>
>Another tidbit………..
>Our crew, Crew 45, AEWBARRONPAC, to the best of my knowledge, was the
>only Pacific Barrier Aircraft to catch a Russian Sub on the surface. Our
>Co-Pilot spotted the Sub's wake from 10,000 ft., our assigned altitude for
>optimum radar performance. The Plane Commander was called to the cockpit
>and the plan was to continue on our mission, as if we had not spotted them.
>When we had flown past the Submarine, beyond the radar range of all known
>Russian Submarine Air Search Radar, we went down to the deck, did a 180 and
>got ready for action. Spotters were stationed at all the ports and we
>continued on our reciprocal course. The Plane Commander was the first to
>spot the Sub and steered toward it. The Submarine had half the conning
>tower above surface when we flew over them at about 200 ft. We set up a
>expanding square search and eventually they surfaced and we had them in
>sight once again. They signaled with Aldiz Lamp that they were H.M.S.
>Sub????. We generated, and received encrypted traffic with Net Control
>(COMBARPAC). They informed us that the free world had no submarine in that
>area and that we were to assume the submarine was from a Communist Bloc
>Nation. At that point we were ordered to continue on our normal Barrier
>Mission. This sighting was approximately 300 miles South of Adak, in the
>Aleutian's.
>
>
>Captain, I am curious, and wonder if you came across any mention or of the
>following, when you were going through the Pacific Barrier archives.
>
>A group of five, (5) Aircrewmen disappeared from Midway Island, vanished
>from the face of the earth. The men (representing 2-3 aircrews) checked out
>three (3) boats and outboard motors from Special Services and proceeded to
>the reef on Midway Island. They planned on doing some snorkeling,
>spearfishing and catching some Longusta (sp?). They were between Barrier
>Missions, so they were making a day of it. They never returned, and when
>they showed up as missing, a search was organized. The searchers found all
>three boats pulled up on the reef with all gear and equipment intact. There
>were no signs of anything that would answer the question “What happened?” I
>believe that they all were Petty Officers, ranging in rate from 3rd class
to
>Chief, so I guess you can rule out the theory of youth. I believe that
>several were married also. This happened in late 1959 or early 1960, when
>Russian Sub activity was at it’s height in the Midway Island area,
gathering
>data on the Barrier Mission. Scuttle butt was that a Russian Sub surfaced
>just outside the reef and captured them for interrogation. If you know, and
>can shed any light on this matter, myself, and many others, would like to
>know what happened to our Squadron Mates.
>
>Respectfully,
>
>John B. Lukasiewicz
 

I still have callouses on my thumbs from tuning the ART13. If anybody wants
to learn how, there is an airplane here in Memphis with an ART13, ARR 15
and LM in it, it is a B17 called the Memphis Belle. I will be glad to teach
a class in that lost art. I well remember flying an early morning training
flight so I could have the afternoon off to go water skiing . In fact I had
my swimsuit on under my flight suit. At the completion of the training
flight we taxied in and parked next to an R7V with #1 and #2 turning.
Waiting for me at the bottom of the ladder was Chief Lorenzten, he was
pointing at the R7. He said for me to get on the R7, they were taking an
engine up to Adak for WV that needed it. He said he had sent Dick Dempey
to pack me a bag. He said I had to go because I was the only radioman he
had available that could tune the ART13. The guys in the barracks at Adak
looked at me kind of strange when I took my flight suit off and had on a
swimming suit. There was snow on the ground in Adak.
Another time I caught a reserve R5D from BPP to Alemeda to go on leave,
August 1961. The reserve radioman came and woke me up about 5 hours out
and told me they were going to turn back in the next hour if he didn't get
a position report out. He didn't have a clue how to tune that ART13. I
tuned it up, got a postion report out and then the Plane Commander came
back there and told him to get me out the seat. That was fine with me, I
went back to the back went back to sleep. That was the only report the
poor guy got out the whole flight but it kept us from turning around. You
just had to develop a relationship with that contraption and let it know
who was the boss. You also need a fair share of luck.
Things have sure changed. I have a radio in my airplane that I have had
since 1992 and it has never failed. It also accepts exactly the frequency I
want to be on. No more looking it up in some book and putting in a strange
code representing what you really want.
didah didadit
Gib Pierce
 

Nice story Gib. I also practiced a lot on old "ART13" in The
R7V.............I got my practice between Midway and BBP. Also we used to
take the "Flower" run over to the other Islands and pick up flowers for
everyone. Most of the flight crew was there just to keep their 4-hours a
month for flight pay. I didn't have that problem.....logged over 5,000
hours on the barrier.

Joe Buffalo
Radioman F7 primary, plus a few more flight crews over 4 years at
AEWBARRONPAC
 

Luke,

My two cents worth on the ARC13. I remember the gears were old, and
sloppy from hard use. I can't remember who taught me to tune one, It
could have been Fred Murrell, but I remember using the floresent tube to
load the antenna. The grid dip meter was useless, as I recall. Although
I too logged 5000 hrs, I probably drew an R7V flight only 3 times, and all
were locals. One tid bit I recall is that our R7Vs had all been used in
the "Berlin Air Lift", after WW2.

-- and catching up with your other comments about the guys lost on the reef
at Midway. I never heard any details, but remember the incident very
well. I also remember being put on ECM for part of one flight ( about
the time of the Sub activity ) , and I picked up a radar with fire control
fingerprints. My contact was brief, but it had scaned us to a lock tone
and then vanisthed. Upon our return to BBP, I spent several hours at
COMBARPAC debreifing that one.

Lee
 

In summer of 1959 there was a soviet sub just outside the 3 mile limit,
surfaced and steadily monitoring the WV flights. So the strategy was to
not make regular barrier flights. Instead, we would make irregular
flights. The crews would get ready for the regular flights, then be
canceled, and called on later to go forth. Often we would fly low over
the sub on take off and landing. Very interesting at the time...

Chuck Belzner
 

In reply to Bob Hodes, "senior moment", I was there too in late 58 & 59,
but
never flew a track Lima or Uniform, but remember them. When I arrived at
vw-12 in Sept 58, directly from AF AEW school, I was sent to the 11 week
APS20E tech. school at BBP, followed by Escape & Evasion school. As I
recall, Track Uniform was and early barrior that ran more N-S than our
traditional course. I didn't start fling 'til
just before Xmas that year. I seem to remember there being one other
barrior track also, but was abandoned quickly in the early period.

I think the Track Lima was primarily used for CIC training, not sure.
Later, those training flights, I beleive were shortened and simply called 6
hr turn
arounds.

Anybody ever go along on a PC Check ride?? I did!! When the skipper
dropped flaps, gear & chopped power at 5000 ft over Ewa Bch and set down at
BBP, it was White Knuckle time for this guy!! We went form the
comforting drone of the 4 big 3350s to total silence ( except for the
scream of the wind!!), and a seemingly near vertical desent to the
way. - - and I had volunteered for that flight too! LOL

Lee K.
 

The VW12 barracks at BBP had no windows, Just screening with a canvas
covering strung on cables that you could pull across the screen to block
the rain when it was blowing.
I don't remember what the inflight barracks at MDY had. The COMBARPAC
barracks at BPP was a new modern cinder block affair with glass windows
that cranked open. Don, I believe that barracks was brand new when you and
I got there in the fall of 1958. September I believe. I have pictures of
us in our 4 man cubicles in that barracks.
Gib
 

Doug, Do you remember the Chief buying the little beer joint over toward
Biloxi?? I think he was about to end his Navy career. It was small. I
think it was called simply "Chief's". He made sandwichs, etc. and had
darts and a "Pin the tail on the donkey" set up. Except!, it was a MOOSE
s behind! One Saterday someone arrived with a date ( or his wife) and we
blindfolded her to play "who goosed the Moose" While she was being
guided, -- right, forward, a little higher, - - then Goose him!! The
Chief came out with a half an egg shell filled with mayo. When she poked
her finger into that egg shell she yelped!!

Doug , I know we were there at about the same time. Do you remember how our
test scores screwed up the Air Force marking curve? - - all their guys
were failing! They gave us tougher and trick questions, to no avail. We
ALL blew them away! The class average of my group was high 90s until
about the 7th week. I remember the APA56 week test. They were so sure
we were coping our answers, that they made a different order of the final
test guestions for each student. The whole class aced the final!
The next week they changed from "grade point marking" to "satisfactory /
unsatisfactory".

Lee
 

I sure do remember the "chief's". We used to go there and get a buzz on at
discount prices and then start prowling the strip in Biloxi. Besides we got
credit there for those in between payday times. Got two related memories of
one night there. Neither one good but that was the times. My first
experience with 151 rum was there. It wasn't a pretty site. I "passed out"
and somebody had a car and they just picked me up and took me outside and
dumped me in the back seat and went back to the party. 151 sure does
strange things to a body. What happened was I drank enough of that crap to
TOTALLY relax me and I slipped down the seat of the booth and just laid on
the floor. When they noticed me and hauled me off, I was conscious but
couldn't move a muscle. Now I think I know how paraplegics and dead people
are. SCARY. The other memory was as I was getting blitzed that night, in
walks the OLD gal (she was reputed to be 52 - wow!)who was supposed to be a
nymphomanic. As I got worse, I fell in love until
I just fell and they put me in the car. Damm she could drink!

Since then I have realized there really is a Supreme Diety. From my lifes
experiences, I have learned that he looks out for drunks and idiots. Since
I had one base covered and drank to cover the other, I was almost immortal,
thanks to his help. How else could we have survived some of the things we
did?
 

Hi Guys, Geeze!! You all sure have been busy with the Emailing
these past few days. I've been to busy to jump in, but I am reading the
mail when I can. You are filling in the memory gaps for me too! I am
attaching photos of a wetting down party we had, in 59 at Mdy, for our PC.
Don't recall his name, but the crew presented him with his Cdr hat.

I recognized the "pix of the "In Flight" barracks , Mdy. I seem to
remember that they added fixed louvers to the outside too, sometime in 59
or 60. They blocked the sunlight , but allowed ventalation. Gotta
see if I have a pix someware. The card game shot looks pre-louvers.

Ah, yes! I remember the, one time , fresh water showers also. We were at
Mdy for the Hurricane.

The burned barracks was of VW14s, looking across "Murphy's Marsh", right??
(noon, fighter plane-, handball courts, right??)

Reunions: PAX is quite close, and we have our reservations. A
southern Calif gathering for next year would be fine with me also. I
would have difficulty only between 1 Nov thru mid Apr. That's our Florida
play time, and we keep that for friends & family. And YES! That
includes each of you too. But not ALL at once!! LOL

I just got the Mdy videos from Wes today. We are going to watch them this
evening.

One more thought! Did you guys know that Lt. Ed Mills, our fallen CIC
officer aboard 16, was also a CW man?? Fred Murrell reminded me last
week. Fred & Mr Mills , both HAMs, ran 'phone patches at Mdy & BBP for
all our guys in their free time. Ask Fred for the rest of the story.

Lee K.
 

Hi Guys, My E&E training was about the 1st week of Dec. 1958. I had
just completed the 11 wk APS20E service school at BBP. We started with a
trip to Kihi lagoon where we all put on our Poopy Suits, and boarded a
coast guard cutter, ( small craft anyway.) and they took us off shore.
By this time we were cooking in those dam suits! That was to simulate
an actual ditching at sea, we were told.

I remember huge swells off shore and not feeling to chipper! We all
inflated our Mae Wests with the oral tube and hit the briney, and our Willy
Victor servival equipment chucked in with us. Except the automatic
inflation cord for the rarts was not used. We had to find the handle and
deploy the rafts from the water. Not sure, but I think somebody was
given one of the water jugs to carry also, - like the ones we had in the
gally rack.

As soon as we got all the equipment up and opperating. ( rafts bailed,
solar stills, desalting bags for instant water, tent cover, radar
reflector, kite(antenna) tranmitter) etc. They sent out a little
helocopter with a horse collar on a line. Due to fuel waight, the
smallest guys went overboard frist, each got into the collar and hoisted
out then dropped back in water. Then we swam back to the cutter and
climbed the scramble nets. Naturally, at 200lbs, I was last man! I
don't think I even cleared the water, he was too low on fuel.

After returning to the dock, we repacked our equipment and were trucked
back to BBP. It was a semi wilderness area on a beach. This was the
start of E&E. We made camp with our parachutes etc. and received an air
drop from an old AD. He put it dam near in the center of the marker.
C-rations, I think. and a piece of raw beef, which we sliced and smoked
that night to make jerkey . We were simulating comming ashore behind
enemy lines, and the second day would be spent hikeing and carring all our
gear on several different compuss courses as directed by friendly partisans
until arriving again near a beach head, supposedly near the safe zone,
but still behind enemy lines. The 3rd morning we were to attempt to sneek
through enemy lines to that free zone. They had so many guys in Russian
suits, we were sittin ducks! However, one guy did make it. He took
to the water, swam off shore
and came into the free zone. - - They LIED, they brought the poor guy
back to the POW compound anyway! It was a harsh day for some. A smirk
on your face was not a good idea! Guys got hit in the gut with rifle
butts, one skinny kid was put in a hole with a tin cover. They over did
it with him! when they took him out, he was very dehydrated and he was
taken to sick bay. -and a lot of stuff, I'm sure you all can recall too!
By 4:30pm, we were back at the training building to fillout a critique of
the course and we were done. My E&E was at BBP.

I won't be arround now 'til Sunday evening, but I'll read the mail when I
get in.

Lee K.
 

Don,
As I remember it, we were first dumped in the ocean off BBP, floated in a
life raft for a few hours trying to make something drinkable out of the sea
water, 'rescued' by a helicopter and hoisted to a pickup boat. During the
ride back to the beach where we knew the E&E training was to begin, Clem
Fournier and I went below and found the galley on the boat with some cans
of
stew in the cupboard and we liberated a few good sized cans which came in
handy later when we were all starving on our death march to the objective
site. However, it was a forgone conclusion that we were going to be captured
by the enemy - dirty commies I'm sure - and we wound up in the prison camp
for a night. I remember we were allowed one half cup of water out of a large
jug with a spigot. When it was my turn, the spigot stuck momentarily and I
inadvertantly got almost a full cup, whereupon the scout master wopped me
along side the head for 'stealing' water, grabbed the cup and threw the
water
in my face. I was so thirsty I tried licking it off my face but that just
pissed kahuna off more. Later that night we tried some lame escape by
throwing cans at the lights to knock them out, but missed and got more
abuse.
Then, still later that night, we were interrogated individually in a dark
room and hit some more. Name, rank and serial number, SIR!
That was an interesting class. Does anyone remember anything else?
Gary Harrington.
 

Pretty much as I remember it Lee. Same area too. Mine lasted all week. We
got lectured 1st day then went to Keehi and field directly after they shook
us down for "pogey bait". All we had were swim trunks and flight suits,
boots and knife. It was all by the lighthouse at BBP. POW camp was
somewhere close to "free area" north of BBP. The Marines gathered all they
captured and trucked us to the camp. It was a short ride. Did you eat that
damm ice plant or what ever it was called. We boiled it and put our piece
of meat in it for "flavor".Tasted like spinach. Worst part was dipping
water out of pot hole to cook with. Had green scum on top but after boilng
it didn't kill us. I think. We then cheated and sent a crew over to the
lighthouse and got fresh water from their faucet. Strictly forbidden, but
this was escape and evasion right??I sure learned the value of drinkable
water in that one and never have forgotten it. I got stranded in the desert
in Tunisia in 1994 and naturally had my water with me. Me and my water
bottle (1 liter) walked out 11 kilometers until a truck came along. Sure as
hell beat beer that day.

At 08:55 PM 5/7/99 -0400, Lee Kalsch wrote:
>Hi Guys, My E&E training was about the 1st week of Dec. 1958. I had
>just completed the 11 wk APS20E service school at BBP. We started with
a
>trip to Kihi lagoon where we all put on our Poopy Suits, and boarded a
>coast guard cutter, ( small craft anyway.) and they took us off shore.
>By this time we were cooking in those dam suits! That was to
simulate
>an actual ditching at sea, we were told.
>
>I remember huge swells off shore and not feeling to chipper! We all
>inflated our Mae Wests with the oral tube and hit the briney, and our
Willy
>Victor servival equipment chucked in with us. Except the automatic
>inflation cord for the rarts was not used. We had to find the handle and
>deploy the rafts from the water. Not sure, but I think somebody was
>given one of the water jugs to carry also, - like the ones we had in the
>gally rack.
>
>As soon as we got all the equipment up and opperating. ( rafts bailed,
>solar stills, desalting bags for instant water, tent cover, radar
>reflector, kite(antenna) tranmitter) etc. They sent out a little
>helocopter with a horse collar on a line. Due to fuel waight, the
>smallest guys went overboard frist, each got into the collar and hoisted
>out then dropped back in water. Then we swam back to the cutter and
>climbed the scramble nets. Naturally, at 200lbs, I was last man! I
>don't think I even cleared the water, he was too low on fuel.
>
>After returning to the dock, we repacked our equipment and were trucked
>back to BBP. It was a semi wilderness area on a beach. This was the
>start of E&E. We made camp with our parachutes etc. and received an air
>drop from an old AD. He put it dam near in the center of the marker.
>C-rations, I think. and a piece of raw beef, which we sliced and smoked
>that night to make jerkey . We were simulating comming ashore behind
>enemy lines, and the second day would be spent hikeing and carring all
our
>gear on several different compuss courses as directed by friendly partisans
>until arriving again near a beach head, supposedly near the safe zone,
>but still behind enemy lines. The 3rd morning we were to attempt to
sneek
>through enemy lines to that free zone. They had so many guys in Russian
>suits, we were sittin ducks! However, one guy did make it. He took
>to the water, swam off shore
>and came into the free zone. - - They LIED, they brought the poor guy
>back to the POW compound anyway! It was a harsh day for some. A smirk
>on your face was not a good idea! Guys got hit in the gut with rifle
>butts, one skinny kid was put in a hole with a tin cover. They over did
>it with him! when they took him out, he was very dehydrated and he was
>taken to sick bay. -and a lot of stuff, I'm sure you all can recall too!
>By 4:30pm, we were back at the training building to fillout a critique of
>the course and we were done. My E&E was at BBP.
>
>I won't be arround now 'til Sunday evening, but I'll read the mail when I
>get in.
>
>Lee K.
>
>PS: As I told Luke & Don earlier, my kids have tagged me with a new
>alias. - - "Deadly Dad"! LOL
 

My experience was like Lee, Gary and Doug's, several tough days but
interesting
to look back on. I remember the guy heading it up in the "POW" camp pretty
well.
His E&E name was Colonel Cinco (sp?) and had himself been a real POW in
Korea I
think. I also remember him to be an enlisted navy guy.

Chuck
 

I remember that when it was my turn to be interrogated in the dark room,
someone
shot off a pistol (blanks) close to my head. Now THAT was a surprise. My
ears
rang for awhile. Hey maybe I can blame that marine for starting my
tinnitus....  Bob Hodes
 

I remember when I went thru E&E, really was scared as my survival
suit was really big and leaked badly, didn't know that until we were told
to get in the water and that a copter would pick us up. We were not able
to communicate with anyone, the foot part of my surv. suit filled with
water rapidly,I really had a tough time getting into the sling when the
copter did arrive, I was afraid of being dropped in the water and landing
upside down, there would be no way to get right side up as the water
would go from the feet to the head,I was sure glad when 3 days were over.
On the second day a plane flew over and dropped some K rations , one I
got was beef stew I believe, heated it up over a fire and it was really
good, (really was hungery) About all I can remember about the excersise.
I remember the salt water showers at Midway, after a few deployments,
I took Ivory soap, the only one I ever found that would make suds. After
returning back home to Ewa Beach, would soak in a tub of hot soapy water
for a hour or so. Later

73 K7RDN Fred
P.S. I ran a lot of phone patches from Midway's HAM shack-KM6BI, the
Capt. of Midway sent a letter to the Capt of VW16 asking that I be given
money to buy a "HAM" station at Barber's Pt., my job would be to run
phone patchs for the wive's there to the Husband's at Midway.I was called
out of ranks one day, given $3000.00 to buy the Collins S line and a beam
antenna, we set it up on the second floor of the hanger,put the beam on
the roof, I had two skeds. a day with Midway, spent the rest of my time
just "Hamming", what a neat job!!!!. I had my own station KH6CVH on Fort
Weaver Rd, Ewa Beach also (1957-59)
Lt. Ed Mills, CIC offecer killed in crash of # 16 ,also a Ham, we had
alternate times at Midway, we would run two phone patchs per person from
his crew, and then when I was in Midway he would do the same for me and
our crew. We had a navigator that was really a jerk, I would put him last
on the list for a phone patch, when it was his turn---the signal to
Hawaii faded out, it didn't take long for him to shape up
Gary, can you forward this to Luke so he can send it to all the guys.

Thanks Fred
 

Hi to all. Don Lee gave me a call the other day and got me in the loop.
Really glad to hear from him and get some info on all of you. I have sent
some notes to some of you, but for those of u who I haven't, this is an
invitation to send me a note. I have a lot of fond memories as I have found
out most of u do as well. I want to especially say hi to Fred "RED" Murrell.
Glad to hear that you are on a "recovery track" and getting along. I
remember
the many days we spent together in both the KM6BI and BBP HAM shacks
together.

Doug, if you remember, we did a rather hit and miss conversation while I was
airborne one night and you were in KM6BI. I think I used some sort of
coded
call sign just to keep the Buno or side number off the airwaves.

I did a 4 year stint in VP-17 at Whidbey Island -- 63 to late 66 -- and did
a
lot of flying/radioing in the good old P2's. We had P2V-7S's and did a lot
of
flying out of Kodiak around the Aleutians and North to Pt. Barrow. Also made
it into Vietnam in 64 and 65 chasing Junks around looking for contraband.
Picked up an "AIR MEDAL" and had a lot of fun in the Far East. Back to
VR-21
for 3 years in '67 and then to Miramar. Did 2 cruises to the Med on the old
FDR, "B" school in 73, bact to Miramar NAMTD instructor duty in 75 and
finished my 23 years as Avionics Chief/Flight Deck Chief on the Kitty Hawk
for CAG-11 where I retired in '78. Worked for Lockheed in San Diego for 16
years in the Navy's Deep Submergence Rescue Vehicle and Deep Submersible
program at North Island. Retired from Lockheed in 97 and now I keep house
and
play golf.

If any of you get into the San Diego area, please feel free to give me a
call
and maybe we can find a cool one or a hot cup of coffee. Maybe I can even
find it in my heart to cook up a good old roast beef or turkey dinner. I did
do my share on the barrier flights and still enjoy whipping up a good meal.

My phone number is: (619) 272-1538 and I live just of f of Interstate 5 at
Balboa/Garnett avenue in San Diego. Just up from Mission Bay if any one is
familiar with the area.

Hope to hear from some of you in the near future.......and thanks again for
all the quips..........one other, I got some of the e-mail discussing the
guys who were lost inside the reef at Midway. Myself, George Seech and
another Radioman first name Ernie...........we were to meet the 3 of them
out
by the "Reef Hotel" in the afternoon in the outboards Special Services would
rent out. We tooled around for almost 5 hours and never did see them. When
we
came back to the beach, they said one boat was still out and it was their
boat. There was an ACW3, an Afro/American who couldn't swim, a 1st Class
Flight Engineer from my crew (can't remember his name for sure, but think
his
first name was Herb as well) and another Flight Engineer who at one time was
a UDT. At dusk they launched the UF (SA-16) and they flew all around the
lagoon with the search light for almost 4 hours and found nothing. The next
day one of the returning WV's said they spotted a SUB which really got the
attention of everyone. Then one of the flights spotted the outboard under
water. When they went out they found the gas tank line removed from the
engine and wound around the transom, sort of an anchor like, but no signs of
any people. As far as I know, they never found any remains, clothing or the
like and the last I heard was they suspected they went onto the reef and
were
washed out to sea by a freak wave. It would be interesting if there was
something on file someplace that would clear this up for us. The 2nd Flight
Engineer for my crew lived here in San Diego and I met him about 20 years
ago, but lost contact with him. His name was K.F.C. Schmidt.

Guess I have rattled on long enough.............73's and DIT--
DIT........HERB
 

I went through at the same time as Chuck Belzner. We never went to
Schofield, at least in my feeble memory. The course was a week or so long.
I was never hungry but very thirsty. Tried some brackish water froma
pothole. Horrible stuff.
The solar still weren't all that great either. We had a food drop.
I got caught during the E&E phase as someone near me jumped up and ran right
over me so the Jarheads didn't have to look for me. The camp was pretty
realistic. Even though you knew it was training you began to wonder about
the sanity of the operation. Of course I was seventeen years old. The
whole world was a wonderous adventure to me, a kid from the sticks.
I was run over by the pick up boat in Keehi. It backed over me when picking
me out of the water. Interesting the Chuck Belzner and I went through P and
A schools together but didn't remember it until I found an old photograph of
our class in Jacksonville.
PJ
 

One of the fascinating things about what we are doing is the differences in
memories. I remember some of you so very well, just like yesterday while
others I remember names but cannot put faces to them, while still others who
I obviously flew with or played with, I cannot remember at all. Why is
that? Selective memory is not always intentional.
Midway/PhoenixCorporation has a ham station on the second floor of the
hangar on Midway now. It is in the same general area KM6BI was. No beam on
the roof though. NQM building still stand, though barely. The antenna
farms are gone.
Our barracks NQM and some others are historic structures and cannot be torn
down indescriminatly. The US Fish & Wildlife Service has an obligation to
somehow restore them and manage them as historic places for interpretaive
purposes. Man, could we throw a party out there now!
PJ
 

I ran a LOT of phone patches from KH6AHQ. Both from the old club site down
near the gym, and later from the new location up near the Tower. Remember,
the locals had to call back into the base because out outgoing lines were
terrible.

Don't recall ever doing much from KM6BI. Remember KM6BM, on the other end
of the island, down near the docks? They had a BIG Sturba Curtain Antenna?

Aloha,

Germ
 

Guys,
When my crew went to Elmendord, we all went downtown to Anchorage. I
was with a couple of the members of my crew in a bar in the afternoon.
Across from us a couple of young women were sitting at a table, after
awhile we got acquainted and sat at their table.
After talking for awhile, I asked the women if they were Japanese. They
said, "Oh no. We're Alaskan."
For some time, I got a bad time from my crew because Lee couldn't
tell an Oriental from someone else. Hell, they looked Japanese.
Now that we have so many SE Asians all over the country, it's
impossible to place a particular person in a group.
Oh well, I'm not the only one. When I was with my family in Gallup,
New Mexico, a guy came up to me speaking in a language I couldn't
understand. I said, "I don't speak Navajo."
He gave me a shocked look and walked away.
Don Lee
 

Guys.....I wrote a note to P.J. about an incident at Midway.I don't
remember
the exact date but it had to be sometime around summer of 60. I know I
had
been flying for a while when it happened. It was the time 3 crewmen
were lost
in the Lagoon after going out in a Special Services outboard. They
went out
around 10 in the morning and myself, George Seech and Ernie Einhorn
(they
flew radio as well) had planned to meet them out at the "Reef Hotel"
area and
do some snorkeling. We went out about an hour later and looked for
them for
almost 4 hours but never did find them. When we came in around 4, the
boat
house said there was one more out and did we see them anywhere. We
said no,
and then we found out it was the three guys were going to meet. One
was an
ACW (Afro/American) who did not knwo how to swim and another was a
Flight
Engineer who had been a UDT sailor. At dusk they launched the UF
(SA-16) and
flew for quite awhile with the search light on but never did find
them. The
next day a barrier flight comming in reported a Sub on the surface
near the
reef. Don't know what came of that. Then later in the day, either the
UF or a
returning flight spotted the outboard in the water inside the reef but
sunk.
When they went out they found the gas line from the tank disconnected
from
the engine and tied around the transom acting like an anchor. No trace
of the
3 guys was ever found. A few theorys were floating around: picked up
by a
Rusky Sub, went out on the reef and were swept away by a wave, went in
the
water outside the reef and met a shark, however, no one could explain
the gas
line tied to the transom and/or how the boat sunk.........so, it still
is a
mystery.

I also remember the day that I was to take muster and turn it in to
Chief
Few. I remember that Larry Kolman (flew radio) hadn't shown up by the
time I
had to turn in the report, but I didn't really want to put him on
report for
being absent. I told Chief Few that he wasn't there yet, and that he
lived
down in Waikiki and probably got held up in traffic. We listed him as
absent
and sent the muster report up to personnel. Abot 9:30 we got word he
was in
the hospital after a car accident on Farrington Highway between
Waipahu and
the main gate turn off. He and one other guy, don't remember if it was
a tech
or radio man were in the car. The other person was killed. I was glad
I made
the right decision on the muster report.

If any of you guys remember it, I had a light green 54 Triumph TR-2 my
last
year there. I lived down on Kapiolani Blvd after I got married in May
of 60.
Then moved out to Title VIII on the base. I have tried in vain to
locate John
Goodman ...aka "Goodie". He had a big bright yellow 49 Buick
convertible and
we always made the trip through the back road of Waipahu for a bottle
of
Thunderbird on the way to town. He flew radio and he and I were
usually in
the barracks as pinochle partners. However we did manage to make it
over to
the club now and then.

This is really getting to be a memory thing. Hope some day to see all
of you.

Regards.........Herb.......dit dit dit dit        dit       dit dah
dit
dah dit dit dit
 

I remember Bill Bunker.  Supposedly, he went up to a/c 16 on its back
and
tore off the aft door to let guys out!!  If you remember, when the
plane was
on its wheels, you had to lift the door up and over a rail and slide
it back.
 With the plane upside down , dark and all, it was a feat to open that
door,
let alone tear it off!

Norm
 

Hi Norm,
I think I remember Bill Bunker.  Was he the huge guy, about 7'??  - -
and
about 2 axe handles across the sholders??   LOL      I'm really not
sure,
since I was in the nose section of #16,   but  I had always thought
Bill had
to be "restrained",  to KEEP him from doing that.   I had heard he had
been
drinking heavely that night.   and they didn't have a Fire Suit big
enough
for him.    No doubt,  he was diffacult to hold back!!

Monte Clark & I have been remembering our experiences that night also.
Since Monte was a survivor from CIC,   you and he should confer.    I
beleive you may have some new light to share with us.

None of us survivers ever had much time together after 21 Jan 61,
except at
the Mdy club with all you guys.    We never had an opportunity,  or at
least
I didn't,   to sort out in our minds all the events of the crash,
until
Luke found me last month.

Upon our return to BBP,  all of my crew went our seperate ways.  All
of our
CIC crew had orders for AT-A  school, and shipped out to Memphis
immediately.   After 2 months in the hanger at BBP,  I also departed
thru
TI,  and back to civilian life.     Even our PC had orders  for the
Pentagon,   -  -   &  after our flight back from Mdy,  I never saw
either of
our Flight Engineers again.

Rodger Halvorson was the only guy who stayed on to fly again.  But due
to
his head wound,   he didn't go on flight status 'til after I left.
It was
Rodger's 1st deployment, and 3rd barrior flight and we hardly had time
to
know each other yet.    Also, as some may recall,   I was 26  while
most of
you were still in you teens.    LOL       Except for my crew mates,  (
who
had all shipped out),   I was probably considered  "over the hill!" at
that
time.    LOL     My social life life  would have bored you guys to
tears!

Reading the mail this past week of all the escapades that went on,
makes
me glad I wasn't  running with you guys.   I would have been wiped out
long
before!   LOL

I see Monte & Rodger on only a few mailing lists so far.    I think
they
would enjoy this banter also,  -  -   and add a few "Twists of the
Tail" of
their own!     Monte Clark addr.
mrclark@arn.net    & Rodger Halvorson   rhalvorson@ksaits.com ,  at
his work
site.

Lee K.
 

Somebody mentioned Alaska, that brought back memories's, I used the
Ham
station at Adak and also Kodiak Is., Bruce Cook was a FE and we used
to
chip in and buy fresh fruit and veggies , we were repaid with fresh
Salmon when in season. Bruce Cook still lives in Hawaii.
   I bought my house new on Ft. Weaver Rd. in Ewa Beach for around
$21,000.00 that was in 1957, only made a few thousand when it was sold
in
1961. I bet the price now would be sky high.

                              73 Fred Murrell
 

I spent a great deal of my "off" time on the South Beach near the pill box snorlking.
You cannot swim or snorkle there now but the pill box is still there.
It is set aside for the green sea turtles and Hawaiian monk seals which can bee see haulled out on the
beach along there very often.
Did not spend much time "downtown".  I used to buy a Petri 35 MM camera every deploymen, then  hock
it back in Honolulu.
I'm sure many of you remember the fine cigarettes like King Sano for a penny a pack.  Even the "good
stuff' was a dine a pack or 1 buck a carton.  Between that and the freebies in the box lunches we should file
a class action thing for corrupting children.
I quit smoking when my son was old enough to pull himself up to the ashtray to see what I was doing.
Scared the hell out of me.  I quit cold turkey.
I have no bad memories of Midway with the exception of 16X10.  Sure is nice to hear from some of the
survivors.  Hope you guys all got purple hearts.  If not you damn well should!
I recall one flight when on takeoff the tower reported smoke from one of our engines.  Though we could
not see anything, we dumped fuel, patially, then landed, no reverse, no nothing.  A fantastic short
landing.  We evacuated via the aft hatch down the ropes.  I managed sever rope burns, went to sick bay,
had them doctored up, went back, preflighted another ship and flew a full track.
Any of you guys on that one?   I don't recall my second dits name or anyone.  I was in a lot of different
crews.  BO I guess.
PJ
 

Hey Guys!  I'm looking for a little help with my very poor memory.
Anyone out there on the Eisenhower flights?  He flew to Japan in the first Presidential Jet named
Columbine just like the Connie he had.  We provided radar coverage both on route and returning to the
mainland.  The mainland segment was interesting.  The WV was full of Admirals.  I don't remember if there
was a second radio.  I think the crew was a make shif one with personel available.  Anyhow we coldn't
keep up with a jet so only saw him for a short time with us busting tail.
We flew into North Island with two turning and two burning.  Quite a site.  It was the same boot engineers
who disconnected the wrong supercharger when a fire warning light came on that screwed up my hearing
forever.  They couldn't seem to get the mixtures correct, so on approach to North Island with tons of brass
in staff cars waiting we put on a great show.  The crash crews dashed around.  I thougt we had bought the
big one for sure.  Smoke and flames all over the place.
Just bad mixtures.
Then off to NORAD HQ in Colorado Springs.  Quite fun for a swabbie.  We had an open house on the
plane with lots of cute civilians marveling at out bird and the your Navy flyboys in their flight suits.  The a
little liberty.  In our dress blues.  Got picked up quick.  The local gals were bored with the Airforce types.
That was good duty!
PJ
 

Hey Herb,
I sure as hell hope the statue of limitations has run out. Yeh we did
do a
LITTLE bit of bootlegging. I won't mention names but I do know some
guys
that did several different things. One was 75 meter aeronautical
mobile
with ham calls. Another was where we got together at KM6BI and dreamed
up
calls like "snake eyes" "boxcar" etc. We used the relay ARC-27's at
the
radio position to pass the messages in the clear between planes when
the
noise was too much on cw. Drove that damm Chief McCaul at NAX5 nuts.
He
never did figure out how we passed the traffic. I do know that if I
had
saved all my CIM's I would have been a rich paper baron. Anybody
besides
LUKE remember those?
Ran a phone patch or 2 at KM6BI. Also operated KH6AHQ. I remember it
as
being next door to the geedunk at BBP. I always figured that's how
Chief
Acosta caught up with me and made me a radioman in 58. He was a long
tall
almost skinny dark skinned Chicano. Best guy in the squadron to work
for.
Chief Few was the radio chief later.
One thing I can truthfully say; I now get more mail than spam!

P.S.
Who was I talking to the night the night we opened up on a random
frequency
and it just happened to be the Pacific net frequency for the C.T.'s
I am
sure you remember them  as the wonderful people who wrote us up for 9
dits
instead of 8  for error sign etc. (The Navy radio police)
 

I remember Chief Acosta and Few and especially RMC McCaul.  McCaul
could
copy code at 50 wpm and talk to you and never miss a character. He
absolutly could not send. When I was at NAX5 I worked for him and his
inability to send code was legend.  One night I had a Zulu message, we
happened on a ship launching missiles. That is another story.   Anyway
all
hell was breaking loose and McCaul for some reason had decided to work
the
circuit.  He was trying to send me a message, it sounded like someone
using
their foot.  Any way I gave him a ZBM 2  (remember what that is?) Of
course
at the time I did not know who was on the other end other than I could
not
copy them. They did put a good operator on.  When I got back to
Barbers
Point I had a message he wanted to see me.  I went over NAX5, I had
been
there plenty of times to look at the red lines on the CT's logs.
McCaul
didn't say much, he just dialed up the fleet broadcast and put it on
the
speaker in front of two typewriters and said lets copy.  While I was
trying
to copy that broadcast he was coping it also and verbally harrassing
me at
the same time. ("what's a matter Pierce? you aren't getting it, you
missed
that whole group" etc etc)  He got all of it and I got maybe 50%. He
then
told me what I had already figured out-He was the one I had given the
ZBM2
to.   I guess that repaired his ego because he told me I wasn't such
hot
shit after all and sent me on my way. It was a rather humbling
experience.
 

Guys,
    People were crazy over Martin Denny. I remember taking dates to
listen to him in a club in the International Market Place. What was
the
name of that place? I think it later became Duke Kuhanamoku's.
    Did anyone ever go to The Clouds? It was down at the east end of
Waikiki. I used to go there to listen to jazz. I think a lot of
military
people avoided the place because it was owned by a guy who was gay,
and
it was frequented by gays. Since I just went for the music, I didn't
mind when a guy asked if he could buy me a drink; I politely declined.
The Clouds was the only place I had ever hear Mel Torme.
Don Lee
 

Just to keep the 'records' straight, this McCaul (me) was an AT1, that
McCaul was an RMC (not me). And, although my dad was USN too, he was
an ETC
but never with any airdales.  Earles.
 

Hi guys,
There are a couple radiomen I remember, mainly through ham radio.
Anyone
remember Oscar Hoyt III?  He is on the net at osc@flash.net.  I
remember a
guy with a Sumbeam sportscar who raced go-carts.  Some names in this
group
sound so familiar!  How about a radioman who lived on the ground
floor, east
end of the concrete barracks by the little league park who played
guitar and
loved to sit in the bar of the upper class hotels and pull hairs out
of his
nose!!!!  There was a radioman who I didn't know who looked like me
(poor
guy).  His CICO often mistook us.

Norm Matzen
 
 

        Frank & Mary <ftrester@fullnet.com>
     To:
        weslee@minn.net
 
 
 

Don,

The name of the bar in the
International Market Place where
Martin Denny played was The Hawaian
Village.  Spent a lot of time at
the Clouds also as they had a
Cabaret license and the bar was
open a couple of hours later than
the rest of the bars.  Took a date
in there one night and when she
returned from the ladies room she
informed me that there was a statue
of a nude man in there with a fig
leaf in a vital area.  She also
said the fig leaf was hinged.  I
ask her if she lifted it up for a
look and she said no.  A few
minutes later bells started ringing
and lights started flashing and a
couple of girls walked out very red
in the face.  How about the other
end of the beach and a place called
Dolans, they had a group that
played the folk music (AKA Kingston
Trio type)  One of the groups that
played there was 3 guys from AEW,
shame I don't remember their
names.  When you walked into the
Market Place, a bar on the left,
Don The Beachcombers, remember
that.  I still have an album from a
guitar player who played in there.

Frank Trester
ftrester@fullnet.com
 

Subject:
        [Fwd: 34X10]
   Date:
        Sat, 15 May 1999 22:40:48 -0700
   From:
        Donald Lee <sacdlee@earthlink.net>
     To:
        John Lukasiewicz <thelid@wi.net>,
        Norman Matzen <NormMatzen@aol.com>,
        "Paul J. Menard" <pmenard@writeme.com>,
        Chuck Belzner <belzner@doitnow.com>,
        Chuck Sparks <chuck@laguna.com.mx>,
        Douglas Payne <gdpayne@earthlink.net>,
        Wes Mortensen <weslee@minn.net>,
        Robert Hodes <hodesrus@cwnet.com>,
        Norm Parker <Nbp789@aol.com>, Joe Buffalo <buff@theriver.com>,
        Jack Weber <jweber2@aol.com>,
        Gilbert Pierce <ghpierce@drecon.cummins.com>,
        "Fred (Red) Murrell" <k7rdn@juno.com>,
        Earl Norris <w8kmo@gatecom.com>,
        Donald Pence <DONPENCE@aol.com>,
 
 
 

Clem,
    If I can find it, I think I have a photo of 34X10 dumping fuel.
    When 34X10 came to a stop, one engine had caught fire and went
out.
You came out on the wing; there was a bunch of standing nearby, and I
yelled, "Get the f__k off the wing. I thought you were dazed or
something, and I was worried something else was going to catch on
fire.
    Lots of you guys probably have the same pictures I have of 34X10
on
the ground where they pulled it off to the side. When they got it
flyable, didn't they fly it to Litchfield Park?
Don Lee
 

 Subject:
        Re: 34X10
   Date:
        Sun, 16 May 1999 00:42:26 -0400
   From:
        "clfour" <clfour@connriver.net>
     To:
        sacdlee@earthlink.net
 
 

>Clem,
>    Wes Mortensen is establishing an archives on his Web site. So how
>about writing us a detailed account of the landing of 34X10? I know
>everyone would love to read it.
>    Your personal account differs from what we were told (by who?).
We
>were told that you guys voted not to bail out or to ditch; it sounded
>like the skipper was very democratic. So, you see, you've got to set
the
>record straight.
>Don Lee
/////////////////////////
        This is the story I've been telling for 39years.  34H10 lost
the
right landing gear on takeoff.  The pilot flew out to sea and dumped
the
fuel.  (that was interesting) When we returned to the field and was
circling, the pilot called back to offer the crew the chance to bail
out
over the runway.  Its seemed like an interesting offer to this 19 year
old
who had no fear (or common sense), I had my chute strapped on and was
ready
to go.  However, no one else thought it was such a good idea.  So I
unsnapped my chute and sat down at my radio position to prepare for
the
(slide for life on).  They had told us that they were going to foam
the
entire runway, but it turns out they didn't have enough foam.  We came
in
with the wheels up (I was sitting right over the top of the giant ray
dome), and the pilot made the smoothest landing of his entire life.
The
dome did not come up thru the floor (as I was sure it would), the
grinding
and sparks flew, and we came to rest right in the middle of the foam.
My
ditching position was to open the window hatch over the left wing,
walk out
on the wing and jump off.  I did open the hatch ok, walked out on to
the
wing, looked down.........hesitated.......and hesitated, (If anyone
has
ever stood on the wing of a willy-victor and looked down to the
ground, its
a long way down) Hell, I was more afraid of that jump, then I was
about
jumping with my chute.  When I landed on the ground, I was in this sea
of
foam, couldn't see what direction to run in, but run I did!

clem
 

Subject:
        Re: [Fwd: 34X10]
   Date:
        Sun, 16 May 1999 15:38:08 EDT
   From:
        NormMatzen@aol.com
     To:
        sacdlee@earthlink.net
 
 

Hi Don,
I am at home so don't have the files to copy everyone on this.  I
believe a/c
34 went to Litchfield.  I remember as they were pumping up the air
bags under
the wings to get it high enough for the cherry picker cable to reach
and
lift it high enough to get wheels under it.  Then they put the
cherry
picker cable on it and started lifting.  A 1st class P.O. was on watch
on the
runway  (so no one would steal the plane!) and mentioned to the Comdr.
in
charge that based on the angle of the cable,  it not being straight
up, when
some weight was taken on the cable, the plane would fall off the air
bags.
The Comdr. told the 1st class to go back and stand his watch.  a few
minutes
later, a/c 34 was on the ground again!  This fall stressed the air
frame so
instead of repairing it to go back on the barrier, it was patched up
and
stripped of usable parts and flown to Litchfield.

Apparently, the plane was
not damaged severely by the controlled crash.  The crew were all given
bottles of "medicinal brandy" and sent to the barracks.  should have
put them
all in sick bay overnight and counseled them.  One of the plane crew
went to
the club and got half shit-faced and was nearly a basket case for a
while due
to the built up stress while still in the air.  If you remember, no
one
wanted to take responsibility for what to do with the plane once the
problems
were known.  They considered ditching at sea, but history was against
that.
They asked the crew if they wanted to jump in parachutes, 10 micro
seconds
all the 'chutes were jettisoned!  The decision was finally made to
belly in.
I think the decision was being bounced around between the plane
commander,
combarpac and AEW command.

Norm
 

ALL -- The info I have shows that BuNo 143211, SH34, arrived at NAF
Litchfield Park, AZ, in January 1961, with 3,655 airframe hours. She
remained there until 21-May-65, when she was "struck off" the USN
inventory; she was scrapped sometime in October 1965.  Earles McCaul.
 

Somehow I have always missed the Memory Lane section of the WV Page.
Read
through it tonight and although most of the chatter seemed to be among
radiomen and after my time (July 1956-Sept1958), I thoroughly enjoyed
reading
it. The men were lost off the reef while I was still in VW-12, and it is
correct that one was a former UDT, although I can't recall his name
either. I
did know him though and we were all surprised that he would have
drowned.
Never can tell what happened.
Someone mentioned the "Camera scope." Never heard it called by that
name, but
I have an amusing story about "sailor ingenuity" and that equipment
(AN/ART-28). During our training prior to the barrier kicking off, I was
temporarily assigned to a flight crew that was selected to fly a series
of
flights to assist the DERs in familiarization with operating with a WV.
Each
flight was planned to operate specific equipments. Unique to the Pacific
Barrier Squadrons, we were assigned one aircraft for the entire flight
series, and we were responsible for its ground maintenance as well as
flying
the beast. One flight we were to attempt a video link using the ART-28.
I had
fired up the equipment a time or two to ensure that I knew how, but no
one at
that time was using it. I was 2nd Tech and my 1st Tech was a chief named
Giles.  Our ART-28 was inop so we went to MATRON 2 (later AIRBARSRON 2)
to
draw another one, but there was not an RFI unit available. The Material
PO
was an AT1 by the name of Morris, as I recall, and he had a reputation
of
being a real stickler (a nice way of saying he was an anal orifice). We
explained to him our tasking and asked him to cannibalize one. Even
though we
explained that we were the only crew likely to use that particular
equipment
he would not let us cannibalize "because he had all equipment catalogued
by
serial number by aircraft and that would mess up his records." When we
left
we were fuming at the idiocy of his reasoning and his inflexibility to
let us
cannibalize and update his records. But, we were not to be denied,
especially
by such an idiot. Chief Giles instructed me to get my toolbox, and we
went to
another aircraft and verified that the installed ART-28 was good. We
then
removed it and switched the name plates with our bad unit. We had our
ART-28
and Morris's records were intact. We flew our flight that day and the
DER
received our video transmission at over 150 miles, a range which I never
heard of being achieved ever again.
It's a bit of a long story, but I thought you might appreciate it.  I
check
out your WV page almost daily and I really enjoy the photos and info. My
compliment. Don't know how I missed Memory Lane for so long, but I will
be
back to it. How does one get involved in it?
Rich Minter
 

Luke,    Ah yes!   I remember all the fuss over crews forgetting to
retrieve (the trailing wire antennae)
also.    On a flight from BBP to Mdy,   our plane had just come from
Keehi
Lagoon, and had a "Brand New" trailing wire installed.     The PC came
back
and told us ,(Radio,)  "DO NOT USE IT"!!     We didn't,   BUT  the Nav
DID!!
The control box was over the Nav table and I beleive it was ment to work
with the Loran receiver also.       The Nav. did own up to it, but the
PC
was not pleased!
Lee K.
 

>Norm: Not to take anything away from Bill Bunkers actions that night, but
I don't think he was near the aft hatch. What I heard is that he tried to
rush to the A/c to help, but was restrained. I also don't think he would
have stopped to try to suit up in a hot suit, even if they could have
fitted him in one. He was one gigantic dude, as I recall. I recall one
night we were playing poker, drinking, and generally making pests of our
selves, when Bunker emerged from his room and uttered two words. They were
"quiet down". The place fell silent, and every one went meekly to bed. He
was impressive. I have tried to recall some of the others who were in the
tube, but my memory escapes me. All of this traffic has triggered some
memories however. Take care.  Monte

Lee,
About trailing wire antennas, one flight I was sleeping in the Tech's bunk in
the aft section of the cabin right forward of the Honey Buckets.  All of a
sudden there was a huge explosion which woke me up.  I jumped out of the bunk
just in time to see one of the ACWs come out of the head and he had peed all
over the front of his flight suit!  The explosion was outside the little
round window in the starboard head and it scared the hell out of him.  I
opened the rear "hell hole" hatch in the floor under my bunk, where the
trailing wire antenna gear was, and it reeked of ozone!  The wire was gone as
was the little Bakelite cap on the tube going thru the plane's skin for the
trailing wire and the spring loaded ball bearing which made contact to the
wire for connection to the radios.  Yes, it was used by the APN-70 LORAN as
well as the ARR-41 at the radioman's position.  Apparently, the plane built
up a static charge and it blew off through the trailing wire antenna with a
mild explosion when the wire and Bakelite contact holder vaporized!
The weight on the end of the wire was a 3 LB lead weight with a conical shape
full of holes.  There was much conjecture in the barracks later as to the
terminal velocity of that weight when it hit the ocean 10,000 ft down.  Or,
if it hit one of our radar picket ships, would it rupture the deck?
Norm
 

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